FishTankWeb.Com – The red fin shark has another beautiful nickname: the rainbow shark. This species is not related to real shark.

In fact, it belongs to minnow family. What makes it look like a shark is the upright dorsal fin.

Apart from the appearance and the omnivorous eating habit, this small fish could actually be the adorable additional member for your tank.

Red Fin Shark Feeding

In its wild house, rainbow shark is omnivorous. Their diet vary from algae, phytoplankton and zooplankton.

While being kept in a tank, you could make the staple food from algae based fish feeding in any form: tablet, flakes or wafer.

To balance the nutrition, feed some protein from insect larvae, tubifex worm, crustacean or aquatic insects.

Another great staple food includes lettuce, spinach, and brine shrimp.

You can say that vegetable is important for its growing period. Schedule the feeding time two to three times a day.

The fish might not be able to finish the vegetable cuts menu. Throw the waste after 24 hours.

Right after the red finned shark has its meal, it may start to nip on the water plants. Don’t worry, this process is normal.

Just make sure you put plants with thick leaves such as anubias or Java fern.

Red Fin Shark Habitat

The only place for you to see the free red fin shark is the stream in Thailand, Southeast Asia.

It has clear water, a lot of rocks to hide, and almost none natural enemy. Other than this, there is no ideal place for it to live.

The pretty fish you see in the store mostly come from commercial breeding.

Red Fin Shark Care

The rainbow fish requires a 25 gallon tank at the minimum. This size should be able to accommodate the juvenile fish.

When the fish grows bigger, it is better to provide the 55 gallon tank. You also need to set the temperature to run from 72 to 79 degree Fahrenheit.

You also need standard filtering equipment installed. Remember that this fish is a great jumper.

Secure the top of the tank with safety lid and also breathable material.

Even though it is a good idea to bring some friends over, you have to consider the aggressiveness.

A rainbow fish should not be paired with the other “shark” species, as they will attack each other.

You are only allowed to do so when you have huge aquarium where each “shark-like” fish could claim its own territory.

A rainbow fish rarely nip or bite its tank mates. In some cases, the red fin shark will chase specific fish non-stop, preventing it to get some food.

Eventually, the opponent feel stressed and slowly dying. This condition might happen to the same species, too.

When you have more than five red fin sharks, they will determine the chaste. In the end, they bite each other to death.

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Red Fin Shark – Conclusion

Raising an omnivorous fish doesn’t mean that you should always juggle between feeding meat protein and vegetable.

Surprisingly, the red finned fish rely more on the vegetable than the meat. There is one more thing that makes the hobbyists fall in love.

Compared to the other “shark” species, the red fin shark is calmer and could have friends from the other species.


source: aquaticmag, badmanstropicalfish, aquariumtidings

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